History of Film: Silent Into Sound

History of Film: Silent Into Sound
Sound was an aspect of film all along with shutter clicks, pianos and orchestras. Voices and soundtracks were a logical next leap.

 

1920s

  • W. Murnau, Sunrise (1927)

 

1930s

  • Fritz Lang, M (1931)
  • Josef Von Sternberg, Blonde Venus (1932)
  • James Whale, Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
  • Mark Sandrich, Top Hat (1935)
  • Frank Capra, Deeds Goes To Town (1936)
  • George Cukor, Camille (1936)
  • Leni Riefenstahl, Olympia (1936)
  • Harry Watt, Basil Wright, Night Mail (1936)
  • Jean Renoir, Grand Illusion (1937)
  • Howard Hawks, Only Angels Have Wings (1939)
  • Jean Renoir, Rules of the Game (1939)

 

1940s

  • George Cukor, The Philadelphia Story (1940)
  • Preston Sturges, The Lady Eve (1941)
  • Roberto Rossellini, Rome, The Open City (1942)
  • Maya Deren, Meshes in the Afternoon (1943)
  • Howard Hawks, To Have and Have Not (1944)
  • Maya Deren, A Study in Choreography for the Camera (1945)
  • Alfred Hitchcock, Notorious (1946)
  • Vittorio de Sica, Bicycle Thieves (1948)

 

1950s

  • Elia Kazan, On The Waterfront (1954)
  • Nicholas Ray, Rebel Without A Cause (1955)
  • Alain Resnais, Night and Fog (1956),
  • Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo (1958)
  • Francois Truffaut, Shoot the Piano Player (1959)

 

1960s

  • John Ford, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962)
  • Jean Luc Godard, Vivre sa vie/My Life to Live (1962)
  • Chris Marker, La jetee (1963)
  • Igmar Bergman, Smiles of a Summer Night (1964)
  • Igmar Bergman, Persona (1964)
  • Emil de Antonio, Point of Order (1964)
  • Carl Theodor Dreyer, Gertrud (1964)
  • Frederick Wiseman, High School (1968)
  • Edward Pincus, Panola (1968)

 

Recommended Reading

  • David Cook, A History of Narrative Film (1996)
  • Bruce Kawin, How Movies Work (1992)
  • Scott Eyman, The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution (2015)

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